Research Papers Advertising

Research Papers Advertising-83
A minority of the Committee, while supporting the principle of truth in political advertising, argued that such legislation was inappropriate as it would be unworkable.

A minority of the Committee, while supporting the principle of truth in political advertising, argued that such legislation was inappropriate as it would be unworkable.A review of the laws in place in the United States shows that various State legislatures have attempted to enact truth in political advertising laws or similar provisions.

Is Truth in Political Advertising Legislation Desirable and Possible?

The Form and Limits of the Proposed Legislation The Application of Truth in Political Advertising Legislation to How-to-Vote Cards Comparative Experience with Truth in Political Advertising Laws Conclusion Endnotes The potential impact of misleading or false statements made in the course of electioneering is undoubted.

This special issues provide researchers an opportunity to present historical research on all areas of advertising with a specific focus on countries and regions around the globe.

The submission deadline for this special issue is September 30, 2018 with an expected publication date of August 2019.

The notion that the law should provide for truth in political advertising is misleading. The question of whether Australian Parliaments should enact truth in political advertising laws has been a recurrent theme in electoral law in recent years.

There have recently been suggestions that the Commonwealth Parliament's Joint Standing Committee on Electoral Matters might again argue for the introduction of such laws at the federal level.(1) At the State level, South Australia has introduced truth in political advertising laws, while Queensland is on the track to doing so.Such campaigning obviously has an adverse affect upon the public interest.It may distort election outcomes, divert voter attention from substantive issues and may even discourage qualified individuals from seeking election.Many of the Committee's conclusions were based upon reasoning by analogy with the successful operation of section 52 of the 1974 (Cth), which provides 'A corporation shall not, in trade or commerce, engage in conduct that is misleading or deceptive or is likely to mislead or deceive'.The Committee recommended that legislation be introduced into Queensland to regulate the use of inaccurate and misleading statements in election advertising.Australia also faces constitutional problems with seeking to regulate truth in political advertising given the High Court's recognition that the Australian Constitution contains an implied freedom of political discussion. Instead, when the argument is put for truth in political advertising legislation, it is really being suggested that the law should penalise electoral statements that can be shown to be false or misleading.However, it would seem likely that the South Australian provision, which survived constitutional scrutiny in the South Australian Supreme Court in , as well as the provision suggested by the Queensland Committee, are effective and valid models by which truth in political advertising might be regulated. No law could require that such statements actually be 'true'.A person convicted of an offence under the provision was liable to a fine not exceeding

There have recently been suggestions that the Commonwealth Parliament's Joint Standing Committee on Electoral Matters might again argue for the introduction of such laws at the federal level.(1) At the State level, South Australia has introduced truth in political advertising laws, while Queensland is on the track to doing so.

Such campaigning obviously has an adverse affect upon the public interest.

It may distort election outcomes, divert voter attention from substantive issues and may even discourage qualified individuals from seeking election.

Many of the Committee's conclusions were based upon reasoning by analogy with the successful operation of section 52 of the 1974 (Cth), which provides 'A corporation shall not, in trade or commerce, engage in conduct that is misleading or deceptive or is likely to mislead or deceive'.

The Committee recommended that legislation be introduced into Queensland to regulate the use of inaccurate and misleading statements in election advertising.

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There have recently been suggestions that the Commonwealth Parliament's Joint Standing Committee on Electoral Matters might again argue for the introduction of such laws at the federal level.(1) At the State level, South Australia has introduced truth in political advertising laws, while Queensland is on the track to doing so.Such campaigning obviously has an adverse affect upon the public interest.It may distort election outcomes, divert voter attention from substantive issues and may even discourage qualified individuals from seeking election.Many of the Committee's conclusions were based upon reasoning by analogy with the successful operation of section 52 of the 1974 (Cth), which provides 'A corporation shall not, in trade or commerce, engage in conduct that is misleading or deceptive or is likely to mislead or deceive'.The Committee recommended that legislation be introduced into Queensland to regulate the use of inaccurate and misleading statements in election advertising.Australia also faces constitutional problems with seeking to regulate truth in political advertising given the High Court's recognition that the Australian Constitution contains an implied freedom of political discussion. Instead, when the argument is put for truth in political advertising legislation, it is really being suggested that the law should penalise electoral statements that can be shown to be false or misleading.However, it would seem likely that the South Australian provision, which survived constitutional scrutiny in the South Australian Supreme Court in , as well as the provision suggested by the Queensland Committee, are effective and valid models by which truth in political advertising might be regulated. No law could require that such statements actually be 'true'.A person convicted of an offence under the provision was liable to a fine not exceeding $1 000 or imprisonment of up to 6 months or both, while a corporation would be liable to a fine of up to $5 000.Section 329(2) was repealed in 1984 upon the recommendation of the Commonwealth Parliament's Joint Select Committee on Electoral Reform.(4) A majority of the Committee expressed the following criticisms of the section: the Committee concludes that even though fair advertising is desirable it is not possible to control political advertising by legislation.Momentum for change has been provided by the Legal, Constitutional and Administrative Review Committee of the Queensland Parliament, which released its in December 1996.After a review process involving the production of an issues paper, the receipt of public submissions and the holding of a public hearing, a majority of the Committee found that it is both possible and desirable to legislate to prevent candidates from lying or misrepresenting facts during an election campaign.

000 or imprisonment of up to 6 months or both, while a corporation would be liable to a fine of up to 000.Section 329(2) was repealed in 1984 upon the recommendation of the Commonwealth Parliament's Joint Select Committee on Electoral Reform.(4) A majority of the Committee expressed the following criticisms of the section: the Committee concludes that even though fair advertising is desirable it is not possible to control political advertising by legislation.Momentum for change has been provided by the Legal, Constitutional and Administrative Review Committee of the Queensland Parliament, which released its in December 1996.After a review process involving the production of an issues paper, the receipt of public submissions and the holding of a public hearing, a majority of the Committee found that it is both possible and desirable to legislate to prevent candidates from lying or misrepresenting facts during an election campaign.

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